Hiphopanonymous

Michelle, bikes,animals,bubbles, college, teeth, mexi melts, coffee, randomness, flowers, dresses, grandma sweaters, unicorns, strange yet beautiful.

stunningpicture:

A village in the Netherlands with no roads; the only form of transport is boat

stunningpicture:

A village in the Netherlands with no roads; the only form of transport is boat

(via maudatook)

menzybee:

Me on any average day. 

menzybee:

Me on any average day. 

(Source: sethspace)

menzybee:

scienceyoucanlove:

Conjoined twins are two babies that are born physically connected to each other.

Conjoined twins develop when an early embryo partially separates to form two individuals. Although two fetuses will develop from this embryo, they will remain physically connected — most often at the chest, pelvis or buttocks. Conjoined twins may also share one or more internal organs.

Most conjoined twins are stillborn or die shortly after birth. Some surviving conjoined twins can be surgically separated. The success of surgery to separate conjoined twins depends on where the twins are joined and how many and which organs are shared, as well as on the experience and skill of the surgical team.

There aren’t any specific signs and symptoms that indicate a woman is carrying conjoined twins. As with other twin pregnancies, the uterus may grow more rapidly than expected, and mothers of twins may also have more fatigue, nausea and vomiting early in the pregnancy.

How twins are joined

Conjoined twins are usually classified according to where they’re joined, and there are many ways that conjoined twins may be connected. Some of the more common ways include:

  • Joined at the chest. One of the most common of conjoined twins, thoracopagus twins are joined at the chest. They often have a shared heart and may also share one liver and upper intestine.
  • Joined near the bellybutton. Omphalopagus twins are joined near the bellybutton. Many omphalopagus twins share the liver, and some share the lower part of the small intestine (ileum) and colon. They generally do not, however, share a heart.
  • Joined at the base of the spine. Pygopagus twins are joined at the base of the spine and commonly face away from one another. Some pygopagus twins share the lower gastrointestinal tract, and a few share the genital and urinary organs.
  • Joined at the pelvis. Ischiopagus twins are joined at the pelvis. Many ischiopagus twins share the lower gastrointestinal tract, as well as the liver and genital and urinary tract organs. Each twin may have two legs or in some cases, one pair of legs and even a fused leg, though that’s uncommon.
  • Joined at the head. Craniopagus twins are joined at the head. Craniopagus twins share a portion of the skull, and possibly brain tissue. This sharing may involve the cerebral cortex — the part of the brain that plays a central role in memory, language and perception.

In rare cases, twins may be asymmetrically conjoined, with one twin smaller and less fully formed than the other (parasitic twins).

Identical twins (monozygotic twins) occur when a single fertilized egg splits and develops into two individuals. Eight to 12 days after conception, the embryonic layers that will split to form monozygotic twins begin to develop into specific organs and structures. It’s believed that when the embryo splits later than this — usually between 13 and 15 days after conception — separation stops before the process is complete, and the resulting twins are conjoined.

An alternative theory suggests that two separate embryos may somehow fuse together in early development.

What might cause either scenario to occur is unknown.

read more

photo one note: Conjoined twins may be joined at one of several places. These conjoined twins are joined at the chest (thoracopagus). They have separate hearts but share other organs. 

photo two from dev bio blog

Developmental biology is off the chain. 

Protect me beyonce!

“I am growing out my hair to teach myself
patience. I am going to cut it to teach
myself loss. On my best days I still don’t
always get out of bed. New York, we have
to stop meeting like this. I would have
texted you sooner but cabs at three a.m.
But boys who don’t mind if I don’t always
smile like I mean it. But the rain and I
don’t always have an umbrella. Everything
is an excuse, so who are we kidding? If you
write me a poem, I’ll probably make out
with you. No, I am not drunk. I just want to
see your naked elbows. I just want to
dye my hair an unacceptable color and
become a totally different person.”

—   Kristina Haynes, “Some Mornings, I Miss You” (via fleurishes)

(via aphroditea)

ohvex:

grey days - new lens
twitter // tumblr // instagram

ohvex:

grey days - new lens

twitter // tumblr // instagram

(via aphroditea)

the-plaid-princess:

When your pet adjusts their position so they can lay their head on you

image

(via aphroditea)

rissalady:

I like when someone becomes a part of your daily routine. It’s nice to talk to someone who wants to talk to you just as much without anything feeling forced.

(via keepyourheadhighbeautifulgirl)

gifini:

If you give two bones Agreed, it would be friendly to cats

pubicles:

Becoming a cold hearted bitch wasn’t really what I planned to do with my life but here I am

(via unexotic)

rihenna:

Favorite moments of Ellen hosting the 86th Annual Academy Awards

(via unexotic)